17 7 / 2014

http://photos1.blogger.com/x/blogger/3501/2298/1600/804072/Markquote.jpg

"Think about some of the classic Disneyland attractions—Pirates of the Caribbean, Haunted Mansion, Matterhorn Bobsleds and “it’s a small world.” How would they fare against the story litmus test? Do they have a beginning, middle and end? A clear antagonist or protagonist? Would they be better if they had a clearly defined inciting incident, conflict and resolution? Without these things an attraction has no story, and therefore is no good—according to the current dogma.

"So, has the injection of story in recent years improved the quality of theme park attractions? Well, sometimes. The immersive backstory created for the Twilight Zone Tower of Terror adds layers of depth to the experience—heightening the sense that the guests are visiting a real place with a real history. However, in Kilimanjaro Safaris at Disney’s Animal Kingdom, a tacked-on story about a baby elephant makes the experience seem less credible, more contrived and altogether artificial. It disrupts an otherwise beautiful and realistic experience."

THIS NEXT PART IS SO SPOT-ON IT’S TERRIFYING:

“‘Story’ is not a bad thing, but ‘plot’ potentially is. The Haunted Mansion has a GREAT story. You’re a guest at an old mansion (why? that’s up to you to decide), a ghostly voice gives you a tour, you see strange things and evidence of ghosts, you meet the ghost of a fortune teller who calls the spirits for you based on your ‘sympathetic vibrations’, and then the ghosts appear and you party with them! In the end, one of them comes home with you. That, along with the elaborately implied (but never revealed) history of the mansion and the ghosts themselves, is a story.

"However…in today’s climate, there would be a forced ‘plot’ with an elaborate pre-show setup (probably using video of live actors) about an evil ghost or demon, or unscrupulous ghost-catcher kidnapping someone (probably someone marketable and cute) and the Ghost Host ‘needs your help’ in rescuing them; your ‘help’ of course involves sitting passively in a Doom Buggy while you hear brilliant ‘immersive’ dialogue like ‘there he goes! after him!’"

OUCH.

TO READ THE FULL ARTICLE, CLICK HERE.

17 7 / 2014

17 7 / 2014

Ah, what could’ve been…

Here’s some tangible evidence of Animal Kingdom’s never-built land, Beastly Kingdom.

From the top: The original Animal Kingdom logo featuring a dragon. The large dragon’s head that decorates one of the park’s ticket booths. The dragon rock/fountain, once seen on the Discovery River ride. The smoking (and occasionally fire-breathing) cave, ALSO once glimpsed on the Discovery River ride. The Animal Kingdom’s Unicorn Lot sign. A small, plastic dragon released as a McDonald’s Happy Meal toy to promote the park’s opening in 1998. The Happy Meal box containing the aforementioned toy.

17 7 / 2014

Two beautiful pieces of concept art for Fantasia Gardens, a never-built boat ride that was to be included in Animal Kingdom’s never-built land, Beastly Kingdom.

17 7 / 2014

"In the mythical world of unicorns, dragons and other magical creatures, guests will come face to face with make-believe animals from legends, fairy tales and storybooks — all of which play an important role in the circle of life because of their powerful hold on our imagination. The creatures will come to life through Disney’s creative storytelling."

Since The World Began's description of Beastly Kingdom, a proposed land at Walt Disney World's Animal Kingdom. Sadly, Beastly Kingdom would never be built.

(Shown above: Six pieces of concept art for Beastly Kingdom)

17 7 / 2014

Concept art for Beastly Kingdom, a proposed land at Walt Disney World’s Animal Kingdom. Beastly Kingdom would have featured “make-believe animals from fairy tales, legends and storybooks.”

17 7 / 2014

skunkandburningtires:

Disney Is Developing A ‘Haunted Mansion’ Animated Special
THR reports: “Disney Television Animation is celebrating the 45th anniversary of Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion attraction in a big way. The studio is developing [an] animated special inspired by the ghoulishly fun popular theme park attraction. […] The Haunted Mansion special will be animated by legendary horror genre artist and children’s book illustrator Gris Grimly (Gris Grimly’s Wicked Nursery Rhymes), who also will exec produce and art direct. Scott Peterson(Phineas and Ferb) will serve as writer, EP and story editor.
To read the whole article, click here.

skunkandburningtires:

Disney Is Developing A ‘Haunted Mansion’ Animated Special

THR reports: “Disney Television Animation is celebrating the 45th anniversary of Disneyland’s Haunted Mansion attraction in a big way. The studio is developing [an] animated special inspired by the ghoulishly fun popular theme park attraction. […] The Haunted Mansion special will be animated by legendary horror genre artist and children’s book illustrator Gris Grimly (Gris Grimly’s Wicked Nursery Rhymes), who also will exec produce and art direct. Scott Peterson(Phineas and Ferb) will serve as writer, EP and story editor.

To read the whole article, click here.

16 7 / 2014

skunkandburningtires:

"The school bully wanted to pummel me every day after school. I would walk home, and he would wait for me. He would come out from behind a corner and — just like in some old movie — he would start beating on me. One day he came after me, and I said, ‘Stop! I will draw you a picture of Darth Vader if you leave me alone.’

"And he had his fist cocked, and he said, ‘Really?’

"And I said, ‘Yeah, and it’ll be GOOD. I promise.’"

Lilo & Stitch and How to Train Your Dragon writer/director Dean DeBlois on when he began to suspect he might have a future in art

(Quote via the AMAZING 2+ hour documentary, The Making of Lilo & Stitch, included on the 2 DVD version of Lilo & Stitch: Big Wave Edition DVD — currently just $9.98 on Amazon!)

12 7 / 2014

skunkandburningtires:

Lilo & Stitch vs. Racist Tourists

This deleted scene from Lilo & Stitch has always impressed me with its attempt to address the casual racism and rudeness often displayed by tourists to Hawaii. But it wasn’t until I was watching this scene again this morning that I noticed another amazing thing about it:

The directors of the film actually cast themselves as two of the rude racists!

At the :10 mark, the two guys in the Jeep that pull up beside Lilo and shout, “Hey, speak English?” are Dean DeBlois (driving) and Chris Sanders (riding shotgun) — the writers/directors of Lilo & Stitch.

While it was pretty ballsy for Sanders and DeBlois to try and include a scene critiquing outsiders’ treatment of Hawaii’s residents, it’s even more impressive to see that they would include themselves in this critique. It shows that they were not merely pointing their fingers at others, but also taking responsibility for any accidental slights or offensives they may have committed while researching and creating the film.

(Note: A better look at Sanders and DeBlois’ animated alter-egos can be seen at the 1:34 mark. That’s them running past — and into! — Cobra Bubbles. For color stills from this scene, click here.)

I love this film!!!

This deleted scene is included on the Lilo & Stitch: Big Wave Edition DVD — currently just $9.98 on Amazon!

05 7 / 2014

05 7 / 2014

"The [character] that I was able to crawl into the most was Lilo from Lilo & Stitch. This was sort of a cartoony-looking girl, but her problems were completely real. Her funky world that she created…I mean, you know kids like that. It was very honest and genuine and I wanted to do an honest job, so I thought about the character a lot before I animated it. I really got into the character, where [I] almost felt that pain that she had. The loss of the parents — you need to feel all that. That was a big learning experience for me.”
— Andreas Deja on animating Lilo from Lilo & Stitch (2002).
GIF: Andreas Deja’s pencil animation for Lilo. (x)

"The [character] that I was able to crawl into the most was Lilo from Lilo & Stitch. This was sort of a cartoony-looking girl, but her problems were completely real. Her funky world that she created…I mean, you know kids like that. It was very honest and genuine and I wanted to do an honest job, so I thought about the character a lot before I animated it. I really got into the character, where [I] almost felt that pain that she had. The loss of the parents — you need to feel all that. That was a big learning experience for me.”

— Andreas Deja on animating Lilo from Lilo & Stitch (2002).

GIF: Andreas Deja’s pencil animation for Lilo. (x)

(Source: andreasdeja.blogspot.com, via the-disney-elite)

05 7 / 2014

"This was the toughest scene to animate [on Lilo & Stitch]. Chris [Sanders] had done these emotional story sketches. They looked so right on, I didn’t know what else to bring to this moment. Lilo asked Stitch about his family and his dreams. She is trying to understand (and forgive) his rough, unfriendly nature. It’s one of those scenes that got to me.”

— Andreas Deja, supervising animator of Lilo (and many, MANY other classic Disney characters)

Top row: Chris Sanders’ original storyboards for the scene

Bottom row: Andreas Deja’s pencil animation for the same scene

05 7 / 2014

"We promised Disney that in trade of letting us do a gutsier type of movie and take on a different kind of story that was completely original and not based on some legend or fairy tale, that we would do a film that was smaller budget, smaller crew, less time to make it. So it was kind of a new model.

"We didn’t want to dazzle with special effects and shadows and tones all over the characters and go for all this realism or dimensionality.What we wanted to do was go back to the films that inspired us. Films like Dumbo and Bambi. They were a lot more simple in their look and I think they do what 2-D traditional drawn animation does best, which is put up an impression of a storybook that’s come to life. We were not trying to achieve depth and we didn’t want to compete with a 3-D look. We wanted to go back to something that’s sort of rich and textured and you can see the painter’s hand up onscreen. So that’s why the idea of watercolor, which hadn’t been done since the early 1940s on Dumbo was really appealing to us, it had that storybook look to it.”

— Dean DeBlois, giving the back-story for Lilo & Stitch's gorgeous backgrounds.

03 7 / 2014

James Baxter’s pencil animation of Giselle in Enchanted (2007).

James Baxter’s pencil animation of Giselle in Enchanted (2007).

03 7 / 2014

Personality-packed character sketches of Pip from Enchanted (2007).